Omega 3

Omega 3

Omega 3 Benefits

Ummunity’s special feed is high in Omega 3. Healthier feed means healthier animals and ultimately healthier food and humans.

Flaxseed, soybean, and canola oils, as well as chia seeds and walnuts, all contain ALA.

DHA and EPA — also called long-chain omega-3s — can both be found in fatty fish such as salmon, mackerel, tuna, herring, and sardines, as well as in other kinds of seafood.

Studies have shown that those who consume fish regularly as part of a healthful, balanced diet are at a lower risk of heart problems. But the National Institutes of Health (NIH) explain that research is unclear as to whether these benefits come from fish or omega-3 in particular.

While the jury is still out on the matter, millions of people in the United States have turned to omega-3, or fish oil supplements, due to their alleged heart health benefits.

In fact, as a survey carried out by the NIH reports, “Fish oil was the most popular natural product used by adults in the United States in 2012,” with about 18.8 million U.S. individuals taking it.

But are the supplements actually worth the hype? A new review by researchers at Cochrane, an independent organization that evaluates existing medical research, assesses the benefits of the supplements by looking at the evidence available.

Lee Hooper, the lead author of the meta-analysis, is an expert systematic reviewer and reader in research synthesis, nutrition, and hydration from the Norwich Medical School at the University of East Anglia in the United Kingdom.